Crime & Courts

Police tipped off to Lexington woman selling meth, sheriff says

Meth is stronger, more dangerous than ever

David Fawcett, a therapist who works with people recovering from crystal meth addiction, talks about the purity of the drug now available and the effects it has on its users.
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David Fawcett, a therapist who works with people recovering from crystal meth addiction, talks about the purity of the drug now available and the effects it has on its users.

When Lexington County deputies arrived at the home of Simonne Alberti with a search warrant, the police found what they were told would be in the house, according to the sheriff’s department.

Friday evening, Lexington County Sheriff’s Department announced the arrest of Alberti, 49, for possession to sell methamphetamine.

Acting on a “community tip” Sheriff Jay Koon said, narcotics agents showed up to Alberti’s house on the 1000 block of Lawrence Drive, a community of mostly mobile homes off Platt Springs Road near Red Bank. The agents found two plastic bags of meth in her bedroom along with digital scales and supplies typically used to package and sell the drug, a department spokesperson said. Police arrested Alberti without incident.

“This is a great example of people serving as our eyes and ears in a community,” Koon said. “Arrests like this make a difference and go a long way toward keeping a neighborhood safe.”

A judge let Alberti out of Lexington County Detention Center on $10,000 bond.

The latest charge was her second meth offense, according to court records. In May 2018, Alberti pleaded guilty to possession of the drug sometimes referred to as “crystal” or “ice.” A judge suspended a three month sentence, giving her credit for time served and issuing fines.

Records also show investigators charged Alberti with receiving stolen goods last month, a crime Magistrate Matthew Johnson found her guilty of after a bench trial. Johnson sentenced her to time served.

Depending on a person’s past drug convictions, possession of meth to sell is punishable with up to thirty years in prison and fines up to $50,000.

In the same neighborhood as Alberti’s house, a man who had just beat stage four cancer was shot to death near his home in 2018.

David Travis Bland won the South Carolina Press Association’s 2017 Judson Chapman Award for community journalism. As The State’s crime, police and public safety reporter, he strives to inform communities about crimes that affect them and give deeper insight into victims, the accused and law enforcement. He studied history with a focus on the American South at the University of South Carolina.
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