Politics & Government

Madam president? In SC, Kamala Harris fuels speculation of a 2020 presidential run

U.S. Senator Cory Booker feels a connection with South Carolina

U.S. Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey spoke to an audience at Allen University about the midterm elections Thursday Oct. 18, 2018, in Columbia, SC.
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U.S. Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey spoke to an audience at Allen University about the midterm elections Thursday Oct. 18, 2018, in Columbia, SC.

U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris gave no assurances to South Carolinians on Friday about her future plans past the Nov. 6 midterm election.

But the sporadic crowd mentions of “2020” and “madam president” were enough to continue heating up speculation that the California Democrat will run in the Democratic presidential primary in 2020.

Harris spoke to a diverse crowd in Hopkins late Friday, her last stop in the Palmetto State after spending much of the day in Greenville.

Repeating a familiar line, Harris called the midterm election “an inflection moment in the history of our country.”

“We all know that,” she said. “It’s a moment that is really requiring us as a country, as individuals, to look in a mirror and collectively answer a question, and that question is ‘Who are we?’ Part of the answer to that question is we are better than this.”

The first-term senator is part of a steady trickle of potential 2020 presidential hopefuls that have this week visited South Carolina, a key primary state that will help decide the Democratic nominee for president.

U.S. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg visited South Carolina on Thursday. U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont will speak to South Carolinians on Saturday at an Our Revolution SC rally in Columbia.

In Lower Richland, Harris used part of her stop on Friday to tout her latest tax proposal, called the “LIFT Act.”

Announced on Thursday, the legislation would help U.S. families earning less than $100,000 year become eligible for a monthly tax credit of up to $500, or $6,000 a year, The Sacramento Bee reported. Individuals who earn less than $50,000 a year would be eligible for up to $250 a month, or $3,000 a year.

The proposal already has caused divided reactions.

Yet, despite overall personal differences, Harris told the crowd on Friday most Americans have more in common than they realize.

“There are so many people, powerful voices, trying to sow hate and division among us. Let’s not let them get away with that.”

Maayan Schechter: 803-771-8657, @MaayanSchechter
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