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  • How to safely watch a solar eclipse

    Columbia is in the path of a total eclipse on Aug. 21. Here are tips for observing the event: Never look directly at the sun's rays. When watching a partial eclipse you must wear eclipse glasses at all times or use another indirect method if you want to face the sun. During a total eclipse when the moon completely obscures the sun, it is safe to look directly at the star -- but it's crucial that you know when to wear and not wear your glasses.

Columbia is in the path of a total eclipse on Aug. 21. Here are tips for observing the event: Never look directly at the sun's rays. When watching a partial eclipse you must wear eclipse glasses at all times or use another indirect method if you want to face the sun. During a total eclipse when the moon completely obscures the sun, it is safe to look directly at the star -- but it's crucial that you know when to wear and not wear your glasses. Posted by Susan Ardis NASA Goddard/YouTube
Columbia is in the path of a total eclipse on Aug. 21. Here are tips for observing the event: Never look directly at the sun's rays. When watching a partial eclipse you must wear eclipse glasses at all times or use another indirect method if you want to face the sun. During a total eclipse when the moon completely obscures the sun, it is safe to look directly at the star -- but it's crucial that you know when to wear and not wear your glasses. Posted by Susan Ardis NASA Goddard/YouTube

Your South Carolina 2017 solar eclipse guide

August 17, 2017 8:59 AM